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Treatment Addiction starts before drug use
By JESSIE DUNLEAVY|August 15, 2018
Treatment
Nora Volkow on MAT, naloxone, new drugs, and why opioids are unique
This is part 2 of an interview with Nora Volkow, MD, the director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse for the past 15 years.
The Julie Eldred case: a symbolic argument is rebuffed – correctly
The highly symbolic case of Julie Eldred became a cause celèbre among many of the best and brightest in addiction science community. They had hoped a state supreme court would say, loudly and clearly, that addiction is not a moral failing, but rather a chronic brain disease.
Nora Volkow on prescription opioids, chronic pain and ‘hype’
Research psychiatrist Nora Volkow, MD—the director of the National Institute on Drug Abuse for the past 15 years—is one of the world's foremost authorities on opioid and other addictions.
Opioid Addiction: Three Ways to Get More People Into Treatment
Surely the most frustrating—and scandalous—aspect of the opioid epidemic is that thousands of Americans are now dying from a disease that we know how to treat.  
Insurers still too reliant on opioid prescribing, study finds
American health insurers are wrestling with their own version of a painful truth: Kicking opioids is hard.
The “gross under use” of opioid addiction medication
“We now possess effective treatment that could … save many lives,” wrote Nora Volkow Tuesday, “yet tens of thousands of people die each year because they have not received these treatments.”  
How a Businessman, After Losing a Son, Is Battling to Fix Opioid Addiction Treatment
When Gary Mendell’s son Brian needed addiction treatment, money was never an object.
Stanford’s Lembke: Most high-dose opioid patients should be tapered down—even involuntarily.
When Anna Lembke first became a psychiatrist, addiction was an area she avoided.
Opioid Addiction Treatment Begins in the Emergency Room in a Camden, NJ, Hospital
Every day at Cooper University Hospital in Camden, N.J., emergency room doctors treat, on average, five to fifteen patients who have overdosed on opioids.
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